Media Coverage

  • Alcohol poses health risks even in small amounts: report – Global News – Dr. Jennifer Wyman, WCH family physician, discusses the risks of alcohol use and the disparities between standard drink sizes and what some people get at bars
  • The Current with Matt Galloway – CBC News – Dr. Jennifer Wyman discusses a report that suggests having more than six drinks/week could lead to an increased risk of health issues
  • Routine vaccination rates for children, teens in Canada dropped dramatically since start of COVID-19 pandemic (PDF of article) – Globe and Mail – Canadian physicians are concerned about a drop in childhood and teen vaccination as students head back to school, including Dr. Noah Ivers, WCH family physician, who says there will be challenges to get vaccine programs back on track, including logistical and communications-related work
  • Advice for managing migraines from a neurologist (pitched media) – Canadian Living – Dr. Marissa Lagman, headache neurologist at WCH’s Centre for Headache, discusses common migraine triggers and how to manage them, including screen time and screen breaks, proper sleep schedules, proper eating and stress management
  • 7-time Canadian Olympic medalist Penny Oleksiak undergoes surgery on a torn meniscus – Swim Swam – A well-know Canadian Olympic medalist recently underwent surgery at Women’s College Hospital, giving a shoutout to her physician, Dr. Theo, and the team overseeing her care on Instagram
  • Trudeau tweaks cabinet, swapping ministers Tassi and Jaczek – CBC News – Helena Jaczek, who previously practiced medicine at WCH, has been moved into the role of Minister of Public Services and Procurement in a federal gov’t cabinet swap; Jaczek previously served as Ontario’s minister of health and LTC and minister of community and social services
  • Artificial intelligence and predictive algorithms in medicine – Canadian Family Physician – A study looking into how AI could play a role in preventative medical practice, co-led by WCH Family Physician Sheryl Spithoff, examines the problems and promises of adapting AI into patient care
  • Award-winning humanitarian and author Samantha Nutt to speak at UNH – Newsbreak – WCH staff physician Dr. Samantha Nutt will be presenting a talk called “Beyond the Headlines” at the University of New Hampshire, with the goal to shed some light on the aspects of global emergencies not mentioned in the media
  • International residency program promotes creative and cultural exchange – Education News Canada – Nadia McLaren, specialist in the Indigenous Health and Education at the Centre for Wise Practices at Women’s, co-created a program in which participants from the University of the Bahamas (UB) and community members from the Project ICE (Incubator for Collaborative Expression) got to collaborate in examining how colonialism has shaped how we produce, understand and display art through material explorations, community engagement and creative collaboration
  • Physician home visits in Ontario: a cross-sectional analysis of patient characteristics and postvisit use of health care services – CMAJ Open A study on physician home physicians conducted by researchers from UHN as well as Yingbo Na, an analyst from Women’s College Research Institute, found that about half of physician home visits assessed were to patients in a younger age group who were relatively healthy and not receiving palliative or home care, and found opportunities to refine policies to use home visits to target patients most likely to benefit from them
  • What one Toronto Hospital is doing to ramp up screening for breast cancer – and to make sure no one gets left behind – The Star – WCH’s Dr. Aisha Lofters discusses the underrepresentation of women of colour in breast cancer screening outreach and treatment, and explains how WCH is working to connect with under-screened groups to increase the number of mammograms to Black, Muslim, and women of colour as well as trans individuals who may feel gender-dysphoria when accessing these services; WCHF’s fundraising initiative to secure more mammography machines as well as WCH’s Breast Cancer Awareness month event and Black Women Resource Hub is also discussed as ways the hospital is trying to reach under-screened communities
  • CTV “Your Morning” interview (starting at 1:1:56) – CTV News – WCH family physician Dr. Vanessa Reddit discusses the benefits of Ontario’s temporary health policy to extend health coverage to uninsured people; the Ministry of Health has said no changes are planned to the measure, but advocates including Dr. Redditt remain concerned as other temporary COVID measures begin to be repealed as they urge the gov’t to make the policy permanent
  • 13 signs you are taking too many prescriptions – MSN – Taking five or more prescriptions could put you at risk of harmful drug interactions; WCH’s Dr. Paula Rochon, geriatrician, says that patients should ask their doctor several questions before starting a new medication, including if the drug is treating side effects of another medication, if there is a substitute for the drug causing the side effects, and is the drug necessary
  • CTV segment – CTV Your Morning Weekend – Dr Amanda Selk, OBGYN at Mount Sinai and WCH, discusses on air the recommendation to use HPV tests as opposed to PAP smears as a more effective way of screening for cervical cancer
  • Spare the nerves in deep infiltrative endometriosis surgery – MDedge – Dr. Nucelio Lemos and Dr. Meghan McGrattan, WCH Gynecology department, were invited to Dr. Charles E. Miller’s latest edition of the Master Class in Gynecologic Surgery to review approaches to nerve-sparing surgery in endometriosis cases
  • As head of Kids Help Phone, Katherine Hay is helping the charity evolve with technology and culture – Women of Influence – Katherine Hay, former president and CEO of WCH Foundation, and now President and CEO of Kids Help Phone, is working on innovating ways to help young people access mental health support
  • 13 signs you are taking too many prescriptions – MSN – Taking five or more prescriptions could put you at risk of harmful drug interactions; WCH’s Dr. Paula Rochon, geriatrician, says that patients should ask their doctor several questions before starting a new medication, including if the drug is treating side effects of another medication, if there is a substitute for the drug causing the side effects, and is the drug necessary
  • Cannabis Concerns for Kids – American Council on Science and Health – Dr. Meldon Kahan, Medical Director in substances use service at Women’s College Hospital, is cited in a larger article that talks about the importance of keeping children safe from cannabis abuse, explaining that cannabis is still not safe for younger age ranges, despite cannabis companies promoting their products to those age ranges
  • Importance of getting a breast cancer screening – CTV News – Dr. Aisha Lofters from WCH’s Peter Gilgan Centre for Women’s Cancers explains how WCH is working to try and eliminate the backlog of breast cancer screenings through outreach to anyone with breasts to encourage them to get screened as well as active fundraising for four new mammography machines
  • News Clip – CBCWCH is one of the many hospitals being impacted by the healthcare providers’ shortage, and patients are starting to run out of options as they can’t get connected to a family doctor.
  • Canada’s breast-screening measures aren’t equitable enough – The Globe and Mail – WCH’s Dr. Aisha Lofters speaks to the importance of enhancing equitable access to breast screening for all to catch cancer and pre-cancer when it’s most treatable
  • The hard road to success for skilled young immigrants – Canada’s National Observer – Jad Jaber, a Lebanese immigrant who works at WCH as a research assistant, explains that young immigrants face unique barriers to finding gainful employment to pay rent and living expenses after arriving in Canada
  • Ford government urged to extend paid sick leave amid COVID-19 wave – Global News – Dr. Vanessa Redditt, Family Physician on Crossroads Clinic at Women’s, points out the higher burden low-wage workers face in the pandemic and that we must consider their needs when it comes to health policy like paid sick time
  • Ukrainian migrants face hurdles in accessing primary care, say health experts – CTV News – Dr. Meb Rashid, Medical Director, Crossroads Clinic, is working to help identify the gap in access to medical care for Ukrainians fleeing to Canada.
  • The growing struggle to access gender-affirming health care in rural Canada – Briarpatch Magazine – As Canada currently has few transition-related surgery (TRS) programs across the country, WCH’s Jack Woodman, VP of Strategy, Quality, Risk, and Privacy, explains that it’s necessary for Atlantic provinces to look at providing TRS services and programs, as patients from the east coast currently have to travel to Quebec or Ontario to access these services
  • Ontario Healthcare workers call on province to provide 10 permanent sick days in open letter –The Morning Show – Healthcare workers in Ontario have recently called on the province in an open letter to provide all workers with 10 permanent paid sick days, WCH’s Dr. Vanessa Reddit, Family physician, shares the importance of legislating PTO for sick workers; the province currently just for 3 sick days which are set to expire at the end of July
  • News Clip – CPAC – As women try to find appointments for gynecology clinics, some people are waiting years to find a doctor whose caseloads are overwhelming, including a 7-year wait list at WCH
  • News Segment – CBC Toronto News – WCH’s Crossroads Clinic is profiled in this segment for World Refugee Day (segment starts at 23:50)
  • Aziz, McClure, and Horn join Halton Healthcare Board of Directors – Oakville News – Karen McClure, who has previously worked with Women’s College Hospital amongst other hospitals, was recently appointed the new member of the Board of Directors in Halton Healthcare.
  • Increasing demand for gender-affirming surgeries in Canada – CTV News – With the growing wait list for gender-affirming surgeries in Canada and limited options, Jack Woodman, VP of Strategy and Quality at Women’s College, shares their expertise on the subject.
  • News Clip – CTV News – Women’s College Hospital is acknowledged as a pioneer for trans healthcare since 2019.
  • Evaluation of a High-Sensitivity Organ-Targeted PET Camera – MDPI – Women’s College Hospital participated in a study to evaluate the performance of the Radialis organ-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) Canera
  • A quiet violence: Navigating Female Genital Cutting as an LGBTQ+ Survivor – Media Line – Dr. Marci Bowers, a pelvic and gynecologic surgeon who initiated trans surgical education programs at different hospitals, including WCH, is one of several advocates with intimate knowledge on the topic of female genital cutting (FGC) among the LGBTQ2S+ community invited to participate in this groundbreaking event being held on June 23
  • Consensus statement from civil society and academic institutions calls for a gender-responsive pandemic treaty – ICJ – The International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), part of a coalition of 17 civil society organizations, is calling for a gender-responsive strategy for future pandemic management that commits to gender equality and human rights, and is endorsed by over a dozen organizations including WCH’s Women’s Age Lab
  • Healtchare pioneers – Hospital NewsEminetra Canada – Dr. Meb Rashid, founder and medical director of the Crossroads Clinic at the Women’s College Hospital, is one of the 2022 Canadian Medical Association (CMA) Award Winners due to its extraordinary contributions on healthcare and as a refugee health advocate.
  • Virtual Rehab is here to stay! – ReBalance Sports Medicine – As virtual healthcare has become a go-to, a poll from Women’s College Hospital determined that 91% of patients polled were very satisfied with their experience, opening a door for virtual care in rehab
  • News clip – Global News Morning – As mask mandates in high-risk areas are set to end tomorrow, several Toronto hospitals, including Sinai Health, UHN hospitals, and WCH plan to keep their own mask policies in place for the foreseeable future
  • Drivers, take note: road closures planned across Toronto this weekend – CBC News – Several events causing road closures are taking place this weekend, including WCHF’s Run for Women
  • Ontario needs to think bigger on LBGTQ health to address pandemic effects, doctors say – QP Briefing – The COVID-19 pandemic has caused up to 45 per cent fewer people getting tested for HIV and other STIs as well as poor mental health and an increased wait list for gender-affirming surgeries, which WCH VP Jack Woodman says has grown “exponentially,” with little to no planning from the province on how to improve access
  • Health of those in the 2SLGBTQ+ community disproportionately affected by COVID-19 pandemic – CityNews – WCH VP Jack Woodman explains that Ontarians are waiting between 12-24 months for upper surgery and up to 65 months for vaginoplasty, with many patients going out of province to get gender-affirming surgeries
  • News clip – CP24 – WCH tells CP24 that the hospital’s masking policy for staff, patients, visitors, and vendors will remain in place past the provincial expiration on June 11, as well as other hospitals including MacKenzie Health
  • Study classifies 232 topical corticosteroid formulations – ConsultantLive – An investigative team led by Alexa Bowie from WCH has classified 232 topical corticosteroids formulations into 3 potency classifications, which can help avoid limitations in comparisons, clinical interpretations, and classification
  • Guest Post: Racism and health disparities in Black Americans – Dr. Sharma’s Obesity Notes – WCH Academic staff member Dr. Sean Wharton discusses the increased risk of obesity for Black Americans and the disparities in health care that fuels poorer health outcomes
  • THEN AND NOW: Collier St. home housed notable residents – BarrieToday.com – The legacy of Dr. Jennie Gray, who worked for the Ontario Medical College clinic for women – later Women’s College Hospital – and eventually rose to become chief of gynecology at the hospital, is discussed in this article about a historic Toronto home
  • Understanding trauma – Canadian Living – WCH’s Dr. Dana Ross, psychiatrist in the Trauma Therapy Program, discusses the psychological, emotional, and physical impacts that can be caused by trauma and the ways that those suffering can help manage their symptoms
  • The development of a patient decision aid to reduce decisional conflict about antidepressant use in pregnancy – BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making – A new patient decision aid (PDA) has been developed in a study at WCH, part-authored by Dr. Simone Vigod, to help pregnant patients with the decision to take antidepressants or not during pregnancy
  • They have already reached the end of the slippery slope – The BFD – As another patient suffering from multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) has applied for MAID, her physician and medical director of the Environmental Health Clinic at WCH Dr. Riina Bray says that none of the doctors involved in the MAID application contacted her about the situation, which she says is easily fixable with adequate housing
  • Ep. 72: Merendiando with Suvendrini Lena – Aluna Theatre – WCH Neurologist Dr. Suvendrini Lena discusses solidarity among communities of colour and her roles as a neurologist and playwright
  • The Current – CBC – CBC Radio’s Matt Galloway discusses the current surgery backlog in Ontario with WCH’s Dr. David Urbach and two patients waiting for knee surgery
  • Alopecia Areata TK – VN Explorer – WCH physiotherapist Negar Amirfarhad works with alopecia and cancer patients who experience hair loss and explains the range of effects hair loss can have on someone; dermatologist and head of WCH’s hair-loss clinic, Dr. Renee Beach, also discusses hair loss and advises against trying supplements without medical guidance
  • Flu shots lower CVD risk, new meta-analysis confirms – Cardiovascular Business – Health policy specialist at WCH Behar Behrouzi and first author on this study explains that high-risk patients can see cardiovascular benefits from getting their annual flu shot
  • OARSI sets sights on classifying early-stage knee OA – MDedge – WCRI’s Dr. Gillian Hawker, senior clinician-scientist, is chairing a Task Force Steering Committee to consolidate classification criteria for early-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) and says that this criteria is needed for many reasons, including that patients can be ready to receive therapies when they are developed (please note, the majority of this article is behind a paywall that I do not have access to)
  • Protein may indicate atherosclerosis risk in patients with psoriatic disease – Healio Rheumatology – WCH’s Keith Colaco and some colleagues conducted a nested cohort study of patients who underwent a baseline carotid ultrasound to measure atherosclerotic plaque burden and cardiovascular risk
  • Trailblazers in health care: Celebrating the recipients of the 2022 CMA awards – Willardpost – Founder and medical director of WCH’s Crossroads Clinic Dr. Meb Rashid has received a Canadian Medical Association Award for Political Advocacy for his work in refugee healthcare in Canada, including founding the Crossroads Clinic, co-founding Canadian Doctors for Refugee Care, and his work in fighting federal cuts to refugee healthcare
  • Radio clip from CBC Radio – WCH Family Practice physician Dr. Sheila Wijayasinghe discusses endometriosis and women’s pain that is often overlooked or explained by other things, like exaggerating pain or mental illness
  • Black Canadians’ chances of getting kidney transplant hurt by race-based adjustment – Toronto Star – WCH’s Dr. Rulan Parekh explains that race-based assumptions of Black people having higher muscle mass – which assumes higher kidney function – is sometimes used to determine who is referred to a nephrology clinic for kidney disease diagnosis, treatment, and transplant, and leaves Black Canadians with a lower likelihood of referral
  • Catch cancer before it starts – Jewish Independent – Tovah Carr, a member of the BRCAinBC committee, explains that as an Ashkenazi Jewish Women, she and her sister are at higher risk for carrying the BRCA genes and both were found to test positive for BRCA1 genes after volunteering for WCH’s Screen Project study
  • After centuries of exclusion, medical research on women still has a way to go – The Varsity – while discussing the health gap for women in healthcare and research, WCH’s Cardiovascular Health Initiative is discussed as the first program of its kind in Canada and its aim to help women struggling with heart conditions and provide women-focused rehabilitation
  • Are you really getting a deal at your favourite dollar store? – CBC News – The dollar store has begun carrying pregnancy tests and WCH family physician Dr. Dara Maker says that she recommends dollar store pregnancy tests for her patients who are trying to conceive, saying that they are just as effective as tests from other stores
  • To age well, get out there and walk – Toronto Star – WCH’s Dr. Paula Rochon wrote a piece about the benefits of regular walking on aging, including improvements to physical health and creating social connections
  • Cardio-rheumatology: it’s time to collaborate – Nature Reviews – WCH’s Lihi Eder and Paula Harvey’s review on the need for interdisciplinary model of care for improving cardiovascular health in patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal disease (please note, this review is behind a paywall and I can’t find it on any other publications)
  • Endometriosis Awareness Month – CityNews – WCH’s Dr. Yolanda Kirkham explains what endometriosis is and what effects the pandemic has had on surgery backlogs for patients